Prized Cascade forestland about size of Tacoma preserved

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Prized Cascade forestland about size of Tacoma preserved

Postby Tawmass » Tue Oct 28, 2014 6:09 am

Got this from Washington Off Highway Vehicle Alliance (WOHVA). Unfortunately the enviro extremists have deep pockets. You can now kiss riding in this area good bye...
-Tom


Washington Off Highway Vehicle Alliance (WOHVA) wrote:The Nature Conservancy just bought 47,921 acres in WA State...it's probably safe to say you won't be taking your OHV there any longer. Check out the map linked below.
http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/ ... onxml.html

Originally published Monday, October 27, 2014 at 8:10 PM

Prized Cascade forestland about size of Tacoma to be preserved
The Nature Conservancy will buy almost 48,000 acres of forestland between Snoqualmie Pass and Cle Elum owned by a timber company. It’s the largest land purchase by the group in Washington state.


By Lynn Thompson
Seattle Times staff reporter
Image

A conservation group will buy almost 48,000 acres of forestland along Interstate 90 between Snoqualmie Pass and Cle Elum, Kittitas County, to protect wildlife habitat, outdoor recreation and the headwaters of the Yakima River.

The Nature Conservancy announced Monday in Seattle that it would purchase the land from timber company Plum Creek for about $49 million. The group said the 75 square miles of Cascade Mountains forestland was its largest acquisition ever in Washington state.

The group also announced the purchase of 117,000 acres from Plum Creek in Montana’s Blackfoot River Valley for $85 million.

The Washington purchase will allow a checkerboard of private timberland to be conserved and managed in collaboration with state and federal agencies, communities and Indian tribes, said Melissa Garvey, the Nature Conservancy’s deputy state director.

“What’s really important is the location. This is the backyard wilderness for both Eastern and Western Washington and a critical part of the water supply for Yakima Valley agriculture,” Garvey said.

To put the purchase in perspective, she said it’s a little larger than the city of Tacoma and about twice the size of all the parks combined in King County.

Other conservation leaders said land acquisition was at the top of their wish list.

“It’s huge and it’s wonderful,” said Bill Chapman, founding board member and past president of the Mountains to Sound Greenway. “If you blue-skyed the best thing you could do for conservation in Washington, this is where you’d go.”

Chapman said the land was identified as a priority five years ago by leading state conservation and environmental groups.

Another priority, 50,000 acres along the Teanaway River Valley east of Cle Elum, was purchased last year by the state.

The land purchase, a part of the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, will connect state and federal wilderness areas that provide habitat to elk, wolverine, spotted owls and salmon, and are home to Ponderosa pine and Noble fir. It also touches three major lakes, Keechelus, Kachess and Cle Elum, as well as 390 miles of rivers and streams.

Garvey, of the Nature Conservancy, said the condition of the forest varies from logged timberland to dense stands of trees in need of thinning to reduce the risk of fire. “We’re still in the process of understanding the land,” she said.

She said the next step, once the property sale closes in December, is to work with community members and stakeholders to develop a long-term vision.

The land was left in a checkerboard of public and private ownership by land grants to railroads 150 years ago.

A goal of the conservation groups has been to reunite the land and provide collaborative management of its resources, she said.

Lynn Thompson: lthompson@seattletimes.com or 206-464-8305. On Twitter @lthompsontimes
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Re: Prized Cascade forestland about size of Tacoma preserved

Postby edgy » Tue Oct 28, 2014 12:11 pm

Yes they do have deeep pockets filled with$ and politicians, ever see beaters outside an REI?

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Re: Prized Cascade forestland about size of Tacoma preserved

Postby Rx2Ride » Tue Oct 28, 2014 8:16 pm

Is the Nature Conservancy going to pay the taxes on that land?
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Re: Prized Cascade forestland about size of Tacoma preserved

Postby Ace! » Tue Oct 28, 2014 9:46 pm

But it says, "A conservation group will buy almost 48,000 acres of forestland ... to protect wildlife habitat, outdoor recreation and the headwaters of the Yakima River." -emphasis added

That's means motorcycles, right? j/k
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Re: Prized Cascade forestland about size of Tacoma preserved

Postby Rx2Ride » Wed Oct 29, 2014 6:42 am

The O and C Lands Act was passed with the expressed intent of providing for local residents. It would seem, to my simple mind, that private ownership of such a large area, that does not allow for any multiple-use, violates in the intent of the original federal legislation. One could argue that the Nature Conservancy could "allow limited recreation", however, visiting the area, without any type of vehicle (including bicycles), without your dog, during the day, does not seem like the intent of the original law. The lawsuits filed by "conservation groups" here in Oregon, that stop logging on O and C Lands has been responsible for millions of dollars in lost income for counties and has contributed to the devastating fires we've had the last few years.

"In section 1181a of the O&C Act, O&C timberlands are to be managed for "permanent forest production" with timber to be "sold, cut and removed in conformity with the principal of sustained yield for the purpose of providing a permanent source of timber supply, protecting watersheds, regulating stream flow and contributing to the economic stability of local communities and industries, and providing recreational facilities."

I am very interested in how much the Nature Conservancy is going to pay in taxes on that land to local counties, so if anyone has any information, please let me know. Thank you.
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