2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Clearances

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:28 am

So let's talk and gawk about camshafts for a bit, shall we?

This here thingy is the exhaust camshaft. The automatic de-compressor (ADC) mechanism is in the middle.
The piece just to left of the roller bearing is the pivoting counterweight.

Image

You can see where the "bump" shaft rotates out and sticks up just a bit on the heel of the cam lobe.
This bump just barely cracks open the exhaust valve, slightly lowering the compression, which allows the engine to spin easier as it approaches top dead center (TDC).
After the engine starts, the camshaft spins faster, and centrifugal force rotates the ADC counterweight .... which in turn ... rotates the bump shaft to a "closed" position and it no longer sticks up.
A small hair spring keeps the ADC in the open position when the engine is off or just starting.

These pics shows the "bump shaft" in the open position.
When starting the bike (very, very low rpms), the bump shaft will just crack open the right-hand exhaust valve:

Image


Image


After the engine starts, and gets to a higher rpm .... the counterweight swings outward due to centrifugal force.
This rotates the bump shaft to the "closed" position and out of the way (see following pics).
Then the valve lever will only contact the "heel" portion of the cam lobe and the exhaust valve operation will act normally.

Image

Image


Here is the intake camshaft. The black, plastic, wheel "spinner" is just that.
It's a centrifuge that spins out excess oil.

When the camshaft is spinning, excess oil is spun out through the openings in the wheel.
This leaves only "oil fumes" behind to be sucked out through the interior of the camshaft (which is hollow)
... which are then routed out through the plastic tower on the right end of the camshaft
... which is connected to the vent hose on the valve cover.

Image

Image


And the valve cover vent "tower":

Image

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Mon Jan 16, 2012 1:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:47 am

Removing the valve shims

Okay, bunky ... time to get brave and swap out some shims!
Actually removing the shims is quite easy ... it's the math part that is the PITA. (grin)

28) First off, take a lint-free cloth and use it to block off the cam chain tower.
Because you definitely do NOT want to drop a little, tiny, HARDENED STEEL shim down that big black hole.
That would be bad ... m-m-kay-y-y?

Image


29) Now it's just a simple matter of flipping up the valve lever so that it is out of the way:

Image


30) I prefer using a magnet to remove the shims.
I suggest using a magnet because: a) it's easier, b) you're less likely to drop the shim and lose it.
(Ask me how I know. :shock: )

Image

Image


This is also a good time to verify that the valve lever moves smoothly and check it's bottom surface for wear and tear.
It has a diamond-like coating (DLC) on the surface to reduce friction --- that is why it looks black.

Image


Re-installing the shims is easy.

You just use the magnet to insert the shim in the hollow of the valve retainer, make sure the shim is in square and fully seated, and then flip the valve lever back down in place.
Last edited by E-Ticket on Fri Jan 13, 2012 2:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Tue Jan 10, 2012 12:55 pm

Calculate shim size changes

Here's what way cool about having a "Flying Ant" on the premises.

"Hey honey, would you please make me a fried egg sandwich ... and calculate these shims changes for me?"

Ta-da! Yah, she's a "keeper." \:D/

Image



31) Get a new piece of paper for calculating your shim size changes.
Here's what my .... er .... "Susan's".... final copy looks like:

Image


Looking at the following drawing .....
You used your feeler gauge to measure the gap between the bottom of the valve lever ... and the top of the shim.
That is what you wrote down as your valve clearance. Or as shown here: .004"

32) NOTE: Because I used a inch/thousandths feeler gauge - I also need to convert that measurement to metric millimeters:

.004 " = .102 mm (There are calculators on the web to do this for you.)


Image



33) For the left exhaust valve, I *want* a gap of .006" which is .152 mm
So doing the math as shown below:

I start with my desired gap: .152 mm
and subtract the current gap: .102 mm
to end up with the necessary change in gap: .050 mm

That is, we need to increase the gap by .050 mm (labeled below as the "diff")

Image


34) Calculate the new shim size needed.

My current shim is 2.04 mm in thickness. (The shim is labeled with a "204")
Subtract the difference of .050 mm
And we end up with a 199 shim.

The "thinner" shim will "increase" the required gap.

But the closest available shims sizes are a 200 and a 196!

NOTE: Going one shim size smaller changes clearance *approximately* a thousandth of an inch (.001").

So we chose the 196 shim. As in, slightly looser is better than too tight!
Remember, valve clearances tend to "tighten up" with wear and time.

Image


NOTE: You can see the available shims sizes in your Engine Parts Manual
or via the parts fiche by clicking on the KTMTALK / Shop Online button.

IMPORTANT TIP: Here's where I STRONGLY recommend you spend the money and get a quality micrometer for measuring your shims!

Image


Why? Because the valve lever will rub off the size lettering and you will not be able to tell what size the shim is!
For example, both of these shims are *both* 208s.

Image


Being able to measure the shims does two things for you:
a) You can confirm the actual size of the shim
b) You can measure and compare like shims and find out which one is "thicker."

That's right. Take two 208 shims. One will measure to 2.08 ... the other might measure 2.085 or even 2.09
Typically, the shims are spot-on.
But you can measure the shims at your dealer and "get a little closer" on your desired shim size/gap if you want to.

Image

Image


35a) Use your magnet to insert the new shims in the hollow of the valve retainer.

Image


35b) Make sure the shim is in square and fully seated ... dribble a little bit of clean engine oil on top of the shim
... and then flip the valve lever back down in place.

Image



And you're done!
Ummm ... except for re-installing your camshafts, bolting on the cam bridge, installing your CCT, rotating your engine 3 or 4 times, and then re-measuring your valve clearances again to confirm your work. :shock:

So ... maybe you should check your math again just to be sure ... hmmm, bunky?


36) As a final step, transfer all your scribbles and final shims/measurments over to a fresh copy.

You should also keep the page that you used to calculate your shim changes.
You will need to refer back to it as well if you figure out where you made an error.

Here's my updated version. It's *very* detailed so that I can look back months from now and remember what was done.

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Fri Jan 13, 2012 2:50 pm, edited 5 times in total.
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Tue Jan 10, 2012 2:45 pm

Installing the camshafts


37) Before installing the camshafts, do the following:

PREP:
• Inspect the camshafts to make sure there is no dust, dirt, or lint on them. Clean as needed.
• Apply clean engine oil to the following surfaces:
... All camshaft bearing surfaces and journals
... The contact face and head of the black valve lever arms
... In the "saddle" area of the plain bearing surfaces of the head (as shown below)

IMPORTANT! This will be the only lubrication available until oil pressure is returned.
You might even want to use a high-quality engine assembly lube on the critical surfaces.

Image


38) Re-installing the camshafts is a fairly straightforward affair.
For the most part, you are simply reversing the steps you used to remove them.
Just remember to move slow and carefully, avoid banging or scraping the camshafts.

IMPORTANT! The roller bearings on the camshafts have a snap-ring on them that indexes into matching slots on the head and the cam bridge.
You need to make sure that these are lined up and started before trying to seat the camshafts.
DO NOT FORCE THE CAMSHAFTS!
If they are not installing smoothly and evenly - something is not lined up correctly.

TIP: Gently and slowly move the camshafts from left to right to help the snap-rings line up with their matching slots.

Because this is such a critical step ... I have copied a small section from the repair manual to be sure.

Image

Image


IMPORTANT! When installing the intake camshaft, be sure to get the plastic vent tower inserted squarely and fully into the head!
There is a small recessed spot in the head for the vent tower.
It MUST be inserted fully for the intake camshaft to be properly installed and laying flat on the plain bearing.

Image


TIP: Remember to use your "registration marks" on the camshaft gears and timing chain.
This will be a huge help and make it much easier to align the cam chain to the proper spot on the cam gears.

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Fri Jan 13, 2012 2:54 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Tue Jan 10, 2012 6:18 pm

Installing the cam bridge

39) Wipe off any dust, dirt, or lint from the bottom of the cam bridge.

40) Using compressed air, blow out the brass oil jets to make sure they are clear.

Image


41) Apply clean engine oil liberally on all of the camshaft bearing surfaces.

CRITICAL!! Do not drip oil into the bolt holes or the location holes for the dowel pins!

Oil is *not* compressible. When you screw in the bolts for the cam bridge -- if there is excess oil in
the bolt hole -- you can actually pressurize the oil and fracture the bolt hole and/or the head casting!

TIP: Take a Q-Tip and remove any excess oil from the bolt holes.
When you're done, check for and remove any snagged fibers from the Q-Tip on the edges of the holes and threads.

Image


42) Apply clean engine oil on all of the camshaft bearing surfaces on the cam bearing bridge.

Image


43) Carefully line up the cam bearing bridge and slowly lower it onto the camshafts and head.

IMPORTANT! The roller bearings on the camshafts have a snap-ring on them that indexes into matching slots on the head and the cam bridge.
You need to make sure that these are lined up and started, as well as the alignment dowels before you can fully insert the cam bridge.
DO NOT FORCE THE CAM BRIDGE!
If it is not installing smoothly and evenly - something is not lined up correctly.

TIP: Gently and slowly move the camshafts from left to right to help the snap-rings line up with their matching slots.


When the cam bridge is fully installed - you should be able to see the all of camshaft "flats" line up with the TDC dimple marks on the cam bridge as shown in the following picture.
They may be *very slightly* tilted due to the cam chain not being fully tight - but they should almost perfect.

Image


NOTE: Do NOT insert the spark plug shaft insert at this time.
You will do that *after* checking your valve clearances.

44) Insert the eight cam bridge bolts and the guide rail buffer pad.

NOTE: Lubricate the bolt threads with engine oil before inserting them.
DO NOT OVER-OIL THE THREADS!!
If they're still wet from being removed, that is sufficient. You don't want them drowning in oil - just not dry.

45) Using a 10mm socket and an in/lb.torque wrench, tighten the bolts securing the cam bridge.

Image


Important! Tighten the bolts ... a little a time .... in a star-shaped pattern ... starting with the outside bolts and heading inward.
This tightening method is used to avoid binding or warping the aluminum cam bridge and the camshaft's bearing surfaces.

Start with the outer-front left bolt, then the outer-right-back, then outer-front-right, and then the outer-back-left bolt.
Follow that sequence with a small turn on the inner four bolts ... using the same star-shaped pattern.
Then repeat again for the outer four bolts, and etc., etc., etc.

Continue using this tightening pattern until all eight cam bridge bolts (#1 shown below)
are torqued to: 14 Nm (or 10.3 ft/lbs. or 123.6 in/lbs.)

TIP: For the lower torque settings, I highly recommend using an in./lb torque wrench for more accurate readings!
It also helps to set your torque wrench at a lower torque setting than the final setting for the first couple rounds of tightening.
This helps ensure that you are tightening evenly as you go.

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Mon Jan 16, 2012 1:46 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Tue Jan 10, 2012 7:03 pm

Installing the cam chain tensioner (CCT)


Because "setting" and installing the cam chain tensioner (CCT) is a very important step, I have copied the setup steps from the KTM 350 SXF Repair Manual.


46) Fully compress the CCT to squeeze all the oil out.

Image

Starting position:

Image


Compressing:

Image


Fully compressed:

Image


47) Then you fully press down so that the CCT's locking mechanism is released and the CCT returns to full extension.

Image


48) Use the appropriate-thickness spacing washers to set the detent mechanism of the CCT for installation:

Image


Image


49) Verify that the inner section of the CCT sticks out ~ 3.0 mm ( .012") from the outer body of the CCT.

Image


You are now ready to install the CCT.

50) Wipe clean the CCT and it's sealing o-ring. Coat both liberally with clean engine oil.

51) Assemble the CCT, it's sealing, o-ring, the copper sealing gasket, and CCT mounting cap as shown below:

Note: The small sealing bolt on the end of the CCT is not installed at this time.
Also, inspect the o-ring and/or the copper sealing gasket and replace if necessary.

Image


52) Insert the CCT, screw in the mounting cap, and torque to: 25 Nm ( or 18.4 ft./lbs.).

Image


53) At this time, your cam chain should still be slack and may look something like this:

Image


54) Using the KTM CCT "release" tool, or an appropriate-sized punch ...... push in on the end of the CCT until you feel and hear the CCT's locking mechanism release and the CCT extends against the chain guide buffer bar.
It should go "boing!"

Image


55) You should now see the cam chain completely tight and under tension.

IMPORTANT! Be sure that the CCT has completely extended and is applying full pressure on the cam chain buffer pad.
The cam chain should be *tight.*

Image


The camshaft flats should now line up perfectly with the TDC dimple marks on the cam bridge.

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Fri Jan 13, 2012 3:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"AYHIN"

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Tue Jan 10, 2012 8:01 pm

Verify your valve clearance changes


It's now time to find out if your shim changes were correct ... or if you have to give a big sigh and start over.
Ready?
Oh, quit worrying ... you'll be fine. (grin)

56) Give everything one last check to make sure that all bolts are tight, cam chain is tight, and
the camshaft flats line up with their TDC dimple marks.

57) Pour a little more clean engine oil on the cam lobes and valve followers to ensure everything stays slippy-slidey.

Image


58) Remove the crankshaft locking bolt and set it aside.

Image


59) Rotate the engine forward past TDC three or four times.
This gets everything re-aligned and squeezes out any excess oil between the valve shims and the valve stems.

Image


60) Stop again at TDC and verify that you are truly at TDC via the camshaft flats and dimple marks.

Image


61) Check your valve clearances after the shim changes:

Image


They're good, right? WOO-HOO!! I knew you could do it!
My shim changes came out great as well. All of my valves are now in the middle of the specified clearances.

Clearances after shim changes:

Left Exhaust: .006"
Right Exhaust: .006" (snug)

Left Intake: .005"
Right Intake: .005" (tight)


Ideally, I would have loved them to be at .007" on the exhausts and .006" on the intakes.
But, you never know. Going one shim thinner *could* possibly put you out of spec.
So, I can live with this. (grin)

62) Record your final shim sizes and valve clearances on your master record:

Image


63) *Lightly* oil the outside of the spark plug shaft and insert it back into the cam bridge.
Be careful, go slow, and keep it square! It is a very precision fit.
Check and make sure that it is fully seated against the o-ring of the cam bridge.

Image


63a) Take some contact cleaner and a clean rag and V-E-R-Y carefully clean off your registration marks on the cam gears and cam chain *before* re-installing the valve cover!!
Ask me how I know. (grin)

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Fri Jan 13, 2012 3:11 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Wed Jan 11, 2012 11:43 am

Finish closing up engine

64) Re-install the thick copper washer on the crankshaft fixing bolt and insert the bolt back into it's hole in the case.
Torque to 10 Nm (7.4 lb/ft. or 88 in./lbs.) Do not over-torque! You will only squash the copper sealing washer.

Image


65) Clean the gasket that rests on top of the spark plug shaft insert. Put a *very* light film of grease on it.
This will help it seal and stay in place when you put the valve cover back on.

Image


66) Re-install the valve cover.

Important! Remember that the valve cover has to line up, and slip *OVER* the protruding edge of the rubber, valve cover gasket ... AND OVER ... the plastic tower for the vent hose.
You also need to be careful and not disturb the position of the sealing gasket on the spark plug shaft insert.
Take your time and make sure everything lines up correctly and is even all the way around.

NOTE! If you removed the valve cover gasket from the head - you will need to clean the half-round plugs for the camshaft cutouts (in the head) and apply a LIGHT film of Loc-Tite 5910 Sealing Compound to keep them from leaking.
DON'T USE TOO MUCH SEALING COMPOUND!
You want to avoid having it squoosh out in a big glop on the inside of your head and fall into your oil.
That's a bad thing .... mm-m-kay?

Image


67) Wipe off any dirt off from the valve cover bolts and put a thin film of grease on the rubber sealing surface
and where the bolt passes through the rubber bushing.
Avoid over-greasing - you don't want any extra squeezing out and dropping into the head.

Image


Tighten the valve cover bolts slowly and evenly so that the gasket doesn't get squashed or pinched.
Check often to make sure the cover is going on square.
Torque the valve cover bolts to: 8 Nm (or 5.9 lb/ft. or 70.8 lb/in.)

Image


68) Install the upper engine braces that connect the head to the frame.
Torque the mounting bolts to: 33 Nm ( or 24.3 ft/Lbs.)

69a) Put a VERY light coating of dielectric grease around the opening of the spark plug cap will help it slide over, and not stick to, the ceramic body of the spark plug.

Image


69b) Re-install the spark plug cap. Push firmly downwards in a straight manner.

TIP: You should be able to "feel" the cap snap over and engage the top of the spark plug.

Image


70) Re-install the throttle cables. This is a good time to check and adjust out any throttle "slop."
Re-install the plastic cover on the throttle body.

Image


71) Re-install the vent hose back onto the valve cover and slide the retaining clip back in place.

Image


72) Install the sealing cap on the CCT and torque to: 10 Nm ( or 7.4 ft./lbs. or 88.0 in./lbs.)

Image


73) Remember to take your bike out of gear!

74) Take one last "CLOSE" look around your engine and bike to make sure you haven't overlooked anything.
Got everything re-installed correctly? Everything properly tightened?
Crankshaft fixing bolt properly installed and tightened?

75) Check your handlebars for any notes you made to yourself. "... xxx bolt loose ....."

76) Install the gas tank, plug it in, and connect the fuel line.

And you're done .... whew!!

77) Not quite. You need to start up your engine and make sure it is running properly.

IMPORTANT!! DO NOT REV THE ENGINE RIGHT AFTER STARTING!!!

You need to allow time for the oil pressure to build up and fully pressurize the camshaft bearings and the cam chain tensioner (CCT).
Rev'ing the engine before this happens could cause the timing chain to skip a tooth on the camshaft gears and get out of time.
And that would be bad .... m-m-kay-y-y-? (grin)

*N-O-W* you're done. (grin)
Congratulations on completing a successful valve adjust! :dancing1:


Cheers! E-Ticket
Last edited by E-Ticket on Fri Jan 13, 2012 3:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby Tawmass » Wed Jan 11, 2012 4:53 pm

Very thorough write ups and photos Mr. E-Ticket, good job. Time to ride that puppy yet?
-Tom
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Wed Jan 11, 2012 5:03 pm

Tawmass wrote:Very thorough write ups and photos Mr. E-Ticket, good job. Time to ride that puppy yet?
-Tom

Aiming at Saturday. :ride
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby davek » Wed Jan 11, 2012 8:13 pm

You realize it will get dirty... ;-)
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Wed Jan 11, 2012 8:39 pm

davek wrote:You realize it will get dirty... ;-)
DK

Wha-a-t-t...?!!! Well, then I'm not goin'.

Get dirty ... Why, that's just crazy talk.
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby Joesnow » Sun Jan 13, 2013 1:53 pm

Excellent write up, very interesting and informative with great pics! =D>

I'm looking at buying a 350 exc and looking up how easy it's going to be to maintain myself...

So we chose the 196 shim. As in, slightly looser is better than too tight!
Remember, valve clearances tend to "tighten up" with wear and time.

How come they tighten up over time? Which bit wears?

What have your clearances been like on subsequent checks? How often would you say you need to change the shims?

Also in the manual it suggests plugging it into a KTM diagnosis computer at each service to pick up any faults, how did you get around this?

Thanks

Joe

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Sun Jan 13, 2013 2:48 pm

Joesnow wrote:Excellent write up, very interesting and informative with great pics! =D>

I'm looking at buying a 350 exc and looking up how easy it's going to be to maintain myself...

So we chose the 196 shim. As in, slightly looser is better than too tight!
Remember, valve clearances tend to "tighten up" with wear and time.

>>> How come they tighten up over time? Which bit wears?

[ET: The sealing face of the valve wears, and wears into the valve seat over time.
So essentially, the valve is "sinking into" the valve seat.
This moves the tip of the valve stem "closer" to the cam lobe -- which reduces the clearance between the two.
Hence the phrase: ".... valves tend to 'tighten up' over time ...."]

>>> What have your clearances been like on subsequent checks? How often would you say you need to change the shims?

[ET: Ummm .... I haven't checked them again since the first adjustment. :oops:
But I will probably be doing that in the next couple of weeks due to the lousy winter weather.
I *will* post my results on this thread when I do check the clearances.]

>>> Also in the manual it suggests plugging it into a KTM diagnosis computer at each service to pick up any faults, how did you get around this?

[ET: As I do all my own service -- unless it's a warranty issue -- I have not had to deal with that issue. But if I do, I would talk to my Service Manager *first* to understand what work and checks would have to be done ... and then proceed from there.]

Thanks

Joe

Answers above .... hope that helps. Cheers! E-Ticket
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Danilopucci
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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby Danilopucci » Wed May 29, 2013 1:41 pm

I have a 2013 EXC-F 6 days, so came with most of the mods. A few pics below with the roadbook, the GPR damper and the fastway FIT system handguards. I also added my GPS to the handguards. Only bit missing is to "lift the odometer/speedometer as its too low and difficult to see... Not sure how I will do it!

First check on the valves, 14.6 hours in the clock.
0.16mm both exhausts and right intake at 0.08mm while left intake at 0.10mm...
Scratching my head if I should shim, but guess that's the way to go!

Man, from your write up seems easy (I've done many times my previous Yamaha), but I've never worked into such a tight space.. Incredible how they pulled all this together!

Sould be flying after this checkup.. Having a acl rehab at the moment so plenty of time to service my new babe and polish it!
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