2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Clearances

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2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Clearances

Postby E-Ticket » Sat Jan 07, 2012 3:14 pm

I purchased a 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F a while back. Happy-happy, Joy-joy!

The complete from the ground up build-up and checkout thread is located here.
It's called "Building the Perfect Wee Beasty"

http://www.omraoffroad.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=40&t=11373

I've completed the first phase of break-in on the Wee Beasty and she's now at 4.8 hours and 127 miles.
So it's time to check the valve clearances, get a baseline measurement, and adjust shims as needed.

*Typically* .... new, high-quality, late-model motorcycle engines come with their valves in spec and don't need any adjustment. BUT!

This is important to do now for a couple of reasons:
• Confirms that there haven't been any big clearance changes due to parts bedding in from the break-in process
• Gives you a looky-looky inside so that can check the cams lobes to make sure that the oil jets are working properly.
• Helps you determine if you have any new problems or if 'life is still good' when you check your valve clearances at a later date.
• And there's always that chance that your engine was assembled by the FNG on Day 3 and he "missed it by *this* much."

So I always check the valve clearances at around 5 hours of run-in time.


I am documenting this step-by-step -- not only for my own benefit -- but as an aid to a brand-newbie rider or someone that doesn't have access to the service manual.
As such, a lot of this may seem pretty basic. But then it's never to late to learn a new trick or tip, eh? (grin)

Well, okay then, bunky ... let's get started!

DISCLAIMER!

I am a *very* experienced mechanic with almost 10 years working on KTMs.
BUT! I am not a certified KTM mechanic ... nor have I ever had any formal KTM training or certification.
I did have a KTM 350 SXF Repair Manual to refer to when creating this document and feel comfortable in the information that follows.

That being said, I make no guarantee or promises on the accuracy and completeness of the following information.
So please ... use your head and common sense. And remember: Your Mileage May Vary (YMMV).

NOTE: If you are not experienced and confident with your mechanical abilities - please take your bike to a certified mechanic.
Last edited by E-Ticket on Fri Jan 13, 2012 1:16 pm, edited 5 times in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking Valve Clearances

Postby E-Ticket » Sat Jan 07, 2012 4:00 pm

2012 KTM 350 EXC-F: Checking Valve Clearances

The very first, most important thing: CLEAN YOUR BIKE ..!!!

I know, this should be self-evident ... but I keep seeing pics and videos of peeps working on their bikes ... and there is a huge chunk of dirt-n-mud clinging to a frame-member ... just *hanging* over the open engine.
So please get your engine and surrounding frame members as squeaky-clean as possible before starting.
It not only protects your engine, but makes working on it so more pleasurable.

IMPORTANT! If your bike is an EXC, make sure that you have turned off and removed the key from the ignition.
If working on an SXF/XCF/XCF-W ... make sure you disconnect the negative connector on the battery ... or have disabled your start button.
The last thing you want to do is accidentally bump-start your engine during this procedure!

1) If bike is dry, use an old toothbrush and brush away any loose dirt around the valve cover, frame, etc.
Pay close attention to the valve cover nuts on top ... and the seam of the valve cover gasket.
Both will be disturbed when you pull off the valve cover.

Image

2) Use compressed air to blow away any loose dirt/dust .... and seal off anything else that you might have exposed:

Image

Image

TIP: Be sure to get up, and around all the cables running along your top frame member.
You'll think you have everything clean ... and then halfway through your valve adjust, you'll move two cables apart ... and a "little shower of dirt and crap" will rain gently down onto your exposed and oily camshafts.
And that's "bad .... mmm-m-kay?"
So wiggle and move the cables and wiring above your valve cover and spray compressed air at them. That'll get most of it.

As a last step, I spray some Windex or isopropyl rubbing alcohol onto a paper towel and wipe around the valve cover gasket.
Last edited by E-Ticket on Mon Jan 09, 2012 7:58 pm, edited 3 times in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj. the valves

Postby E-Ticket » Sat Jan 07, 2012 4:07 pm

TIP: You'll need room to remove your valve cover ... it's a pretty tight fit.
To save yourself time if you need to adjust your valves -- I highly recommend removing/moving the following items to give yourself more room to work and do things:

• Throttle cables. Why? Because they will just get in the way when you try to remove the valve cover and when you're checking valve clearances. It only takes a minute to disconnect and move them and you'll appreciate the extra room when you're working in the tight space above the head.
• Top engine stays (the metal plates securing the head to the top of the frame)

Remember: Any time you remove something, wipe and spray the dust and dirt from those points as well.

3) Unbolt your throttle cables from the fuel-injection throttle body.
You'll need a 4mm Allen wrench for the throttle body cover and 8mm and 10mm open-end wrenches for the locknuts and adjustment barrels.

TIP: Before loosening the jamb nuts on the throttle cables:
== Take some masking tape and mark the "Top" cable and "Bottom" cable.
Once again, this helps with routing and speeds up reassembly.

Image


TIP: Use a magic marker and make a line down the edge of the adjustment barrel, the cable ferrule (the metal body at the end of the cable), and the nut on the inside of the throttle body.
This will help maintain your adjustment/alignment and speed up installing them back in.
Put on a strip of masking tape holding the securing nuts and the adjustment ferrules so the nuts won't spin.
Once again, it keeps everything lined up and greatly speeds up reassembly.

Image

Image


Then tape and secure the throttle cables up and out of your way:

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Mon Jan 09, 2012 8:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj. the valves

Postby E-Ticket » Sat Jan 07, 2012 4:14 pm

Removing the spark plug

4) Remove the vent hose from the valve cover.
And while you have it off ... inspect what's inside of it. Water/moisture? Oil? A little? A lot?
Remember, you're trying to get a feel of how things are *now* ... so that you can spot if things are going wonky at a later date.
A very small amount of oil or oily smooge is normal.

Image


5) Pull off the sparkplug cap. (note the orientation/routing of the spark plug cable before starting.)

Image


WARNING! Do NOT pull on the spark plug wire itself!
If you're not careful, you can pull it right out of the spark plug cap or make an intermittent connection.
ALWAYS lift and pull on just the cap itself!

Image

Now gently ... but firmly pull straight up on the spark plug boot:

Image

Well ... crap.
Okay, Fritzie ... who designed/okay'd the limited clearance between the spark plug cap and the top frame member?

TIP: To help it slide by, I wiped on a little dab of silicon spray on the frame where it contacted the spark plug cap.
NOTE: The second time that I removed the spark plug cap I found that I had more clearance by pulling the spark plug cap out the *right-hand* side of the frame cross-member.

Image


WHOLEY CRAP ....!!! So just how long is this puppy!!!
Good lawd. By my rough calculations ... the spark plug is located just below the piston and just above the crankshaft.

Image


Secure the spark plug cap to the frame with some masking tape so it doesn't "boing!" back in the way in the middle of your valve check.

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Wed Jan 11, 2012 3:13 pm, edited 4 times in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj. the valves

Postby E-Ticket » Sat Jan 07, 2012 4:21 pm

Removing the valve cover

6) Undo the three bolts and remove the valve cover.

NOTE! The valve cover gasket is supposed to stay with the valve cover.
The half-round plugs are sealed to the head with a light film of Loc-Tite 5910 Sealing Compound to keep them from leaking.

However, when I lifted off my valve cover ... the gasket stayed with the head.
So I just slowly lifted the valve cover straight up and gently separated the valve cover from the it's sealing gasket.
Look at the following picture and you can see that how the gasket rounds are sealed into the camshaft cutouts.
Next time I may make sure the valve cover gasket stays with the valve cover when I remove it.

Image


You also need to lift the valve cover straight up so that it clears the plastic tower for the vent hose:

Image


Here is the bottom of the valve cover.

Image


This shows the chamber for the plastic sleeve that connects to the vent hose:

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Wed Jan 11, 2012 3:25 pm, edited 3 times in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj. the valves

Postby E-Ticket » Sat Jan 07, 2012 4:24 pm

And here's where all the magic happens ...

[Editors Note: E-Ticket is lost in thoughtful gaze staring at all the complexity and wonder of a state-of-the-art twin-cam motor.]

Wholey ... crap! :shock:
Man, this doesn't look near as fun as working on the single overhead cam (SOHC) like on my Hooseyburger FE 390. acckk.
Oh well, I knew the job was dangerous when I took it. (grin)

Various shots of the valve train:

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image


Close-up of the automatic decompressor (ADC) unit on the right-hand exhaust cam lobe.

You can see where the "bump" shaft rotates out and just barely cracks open the exhaust valve, slightly lowering
the compression, which allows the engine to spin easier as it approaches top dead center (TDC).
After the engine starts, the camshaft spins faster, and centrifugal force rotates the ADC counterweight ....
which in turn ... rotates the bump shaft to a "closed" position and it no longer sticks up.

A small hair spring keeps the ADC in the open position when the engine is just starting.

Image


A close-up of the cam lobe and the valve follower just below it.

The cam lobe pushes on the valve follower "finger" ... which then presses on the valve adjustment
shim ... which rests on top of the valve stem ... nestled in the valve spring retainer.
So. Clear as mud ... right? lol.

The brass thing right pointing at the cam lobe is the oil jet which sprays oil directly on the face of the cam lobe and the valve lever.

Image


The black rubber piece on top is simply a guide rail for the cam chain to keep it lined up and not whipping around.
Which is required for the 350 motor to be able to hit 12,000 rpm. :ride:

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Wed Jan 11, 2012 3:26 pm, edited 3 times in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj. the valves

Postby E-Ticket » Sat Jan 07, 2012 5:14 pm

Setting Top Dead Center (TDC)

7) Using a 6mm allen wrench, remove the crankshaft "fixing" bolt and it's copper washer.
The bolt is located on the lower right-hand side of the engine ... just in front of the brake pedal.
This is the bolt that we will re-insert -- WITHOUT the copper washer -- after we set the engine at ignition TDC.

Image

8) Rotate the engine to ignition top dead center (TDC).

My preferred method to do this is :
== Put the transmission in 5th or 6th gear
== Using a 17mm socket and a long breaker bar on the countershaft (CS) sprocket, you can slowly turn in the engine if the direction of forward travel.
NOTE: the cams will turn in reverse motion versus the rear wheel -- this is normal.

IMPORTANT! Turn the breaker bar slowly and smoothly!
If you're abrupt or use too much force -- you can actually unscrew the bolt for the countershaft sprocket!

Image


It's good to make a complete revolution or two and then s-l-o-w-l-y come up to TDC when ready.

Looking from the left side of the engine, the camshafts have a flat spot on them.
It is located between the cam lobes and the cam bridge. This is your reference point for the camshafts.

When the crankshaft is at TDC:
The toe (narrow end) of the EXHAUST cam lobe will be at approximately the 12:30 o'clock position.
The toe (narrow end) of the INTAKE cam lobe will be at approximately the 9:30 o'clock position.

Image

The cam bridge has two dimple marks punched into the aluminum above each camshaft.
These are your reference points on the head. See the following picture:

Image


When the flat spots on BOTH camshafts ... line up so they are aligned with ALL FOUR dimple marks on the head ... you are at TDC.
That is, you should be able to just see all four dimple marks ... evenly.

The following pic shows intake camshaft's flat-spot/dimple mark alignment:

Image


The following pic shows exhaust camshaft's flat-spot/dimple mark alignment:

Image


9) Remove the copper washer from the crankshaft fixing bolt and insert the bolt back into it's hole in the case.
The bolt should screw in and bottom out *EASILY.*
If you're having to force the last little bit -- you're not at exact TDC. Gently tighten the bolt.
This will lock the crankshaft in place so that it cannot move during your valve check/adjustment.

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Wed Jan 11, 2012 2:53 pm, edited 3 times in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj. the valves

Postby E-Ticket » Sat Jan 07, 2012 5:22 pm

Checking and recording your valve clearances

10) Get a piece of paper (or in your logbook) and draw a large square representing your cylinder head.
Draw four circles at each corner of the square -- these will represent your valves. You will record your valve clearances next to them.
Now at the top of the paper write the date, hours on your engine, and mileage.
On the sides of your paper, write "Left" and "Right," and "Intake" and "Exhaust."

Yes, yes, I know this sounds like overkill.
But when you're trying to figure out the math for the correct shim change -- or when looking back at this information three months later -- you're going to be very glad you did it!

11) Measure your valve clearances.

And here comes your first challenge for all of you "Murricans" out there.
You can use your feeler gauge that measures in thousandths of inches (ex: .006") ... but the KTM shims are labeled in metric.
So if you can obtain and use a quality, metric feeler gauge - your life will be a *lot* simpler! lol.

IMPORTANT! All valve clearances are taken by inserting your feeler gauge from the "back" side of the camshaft lobe. See following picture.
You are measuring the gap between the *bottom* of the camshaft lobe ... and the *top* surface of the valve lever arm.

Note: The valve lever arm rides on top of the valve shim ... and the shim sits on top of the valve stem.

You are looking for a "light" drag on the feeler gauge.

Image


Here is a close-up view of the bottom of the cam lobe ... and top of the black, valve lever arm:
That's where your feeler gauge will be going.

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Wed Jan 11, 2012 2:59 pm, edited 4 times in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking valve clearances

Postby E-Ticket » Sat Jan 07, 2012 5:28 pm

Valve Clearances:
All measurements are taken at 20 degrees C (68 degrees F).

Intakes: 0.10 - 0.15 mm (or) 0.0039" - 0.0059"

Exhausts: 0.13 - 0.18 mm (or) 0.0051" - 0.0071"

Okay, so I just did all my clearance checks .... and WTH ...??!!! :shock:
*ALL* of them are out of spec. and *WAY* too tight!


Left Exhaust: .004"
Right Exhaust: .005" (very tight)

Left Intake: .002"
Right Intake: .003"

So, it looks like my being slightly paranoid actually did pay off! And yes, I rechecked them a bunch of times.
I even had the Flying Ant check them as well just to be sure that I wasn't smoking dope.
Boy .... I bet it runs better after I get the valves adjusted, eh?

Wow.
Well, it looks like I now get to show you how to pull your cams and change your valve shims! lol.

12) Record all of your valve clearances on your record sheet.
Leave yourself plenty of room for recording your current valve clearances, your shim sizes, *and* your final clearances.
Here is my (final) copy:


Image




NOTE! If your valve clearances are correct - then you only need to close up your engine and you're done.
You can skip ahead to >>>>> STEP 64: Closing up the engine.
Last edited by E-Ticket on Thu Jan 12, 2012 1:49 pm, edited 3 times in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Mon Jan 09, 2012 8:54 pm

Removing the spark plug shaft insert

13) IMPORTANT! Verify that your crankshaft is at TDC and LOCKED in place using the crankshaft fixing bolt.
...............(See Step 9.)

This is critical! If you do not lock the crankshaft in place, you run the danger of valve spring pressure advancing the camshafts once you loosen the cam chain tensioner (CCT).
And that would be bad .... m--m-kay-y-y?

14) Remove the sparkplug shaft insert.

Image


(TIP): The insert fits very closely and tightly into the cam bridge. Lift it up very slowly while keeping it "square" in it's bore.
You can use a pair of "clean," big, flat-blade screwdrivers to gently pry upwards until you get the insert moving.
Proceed slowly and carefully! All of these items are soft, easily scratched/warped aluminum.

Image


15) Start setting your top-end parts on your clean work surface.
You do have a clean work surface ... don't you? (grin) I prefer to use a new, big piece of butcher block paper.
You can write on it ... dirt shows up easy ... and it doesn't have loose paper fibers to get on your oily camshafts.

Image


After removing the spark plug shaft insert.

Image


TIP: Use some contact cleaner and clean the oil off the following spots on the camshaft gears and timing chain.
Using a *VERY* small amount .... put a small dab of white-out on these locations.

When you re-install the camshafts -- you engage them with the timing chain and kind of "roll" them into place.
These registration marks are a huge help in lining up the correct orientation between the camshafts and the cam chain.
But do be careful and don't knock off any of the dried white-out into your cam chain tower!
And also make yourself a note to CLEAN OFF the white-out before re-installing the valve cover!! Ask me how I know. (grin)

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Fri Jan 13, 2012 2:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Mon Jan 09, 2012 8:58 pm

Removing the cam chain tensioner (CCT)

16) Using a 5mm Allen wrench, remove the small cap on the outside of the cam chain tensioner (CCT)

Image


17) Using a 24mm box-end wrench, loosen the main cap over the CCT.

Image


18) Unscrew and remove the main cap. A small amount of oil will come out with it -- this is normal.

Image


19) Remove the CCT ... it should just slide out.

NOTE: A large o-ring should come out as well. If it doesn't, reach in carefully with your finger and pull it out.

Image


Here's is what the CCT, o-ring location, and the locking caps should look like:

TIP: When ever you lay something "round" on your work bench --- orient it so that if it rolls anywhere -- it won't roll off the bench and onto the floor.

Image


Your cam chain will have some slack in it and will probably look like this:

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Fri Jan 13, 2012 2:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Mon Jan 09, 2012 9:04 pm

Removing the cam bridge

21) Using a 10mm wrench/socket, loosen the bolts securing the cam bridge.

Image


Important! Loosen the bolts ... a little a time .... in a star-shaped pattern ... starting with the outside bolts and heading inward.
This loosening method is used to avoid warping or binding the aluminum cam bridge.

Start with the outer-front left bolt, then the outer-right-back, then outer-front-right, and then outer-back-left bolt.
Follow that sequence with a small turn on the inner four bolts ... using the same star-shaped pattern.
Then repeat again for the outer four bolts, and etc., etc., etc.

Continue using this loosening pattern until all eight cam bridge bolts (#1 shown below) are loose.

Image


22) Remove the eight bolts and the guide rail (#2 shown above).

23) Lifting STRAIGHT UP ... slowly and cautiously remove the cam bridge.
The camshafts will stay in place -- they should not lift up with the cam bridge.

Caution! The cam bridge is a precision-fit piece and has locating dowels to center it on the head.
As such, it can be a challenge to get it off. BE PATIENT, GO SLOW, AND BE CAREFUL!!
You do NOT want to scratch it up, screw it up, or scar the of the camshaft lobes and journals.

TIP: You can lift *very* slightly on the camshaft gears, just a little bit, to help loosen up the cam bridge.
Just use your head and the smallest amount of force necessary!

Whew! It's off! Woof. Like I said, it's a very high-precision piece. Those pegs are the locating dowels.

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Fri Jan 13, 2012 2:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Mon Jan 09, 2012 9:08 pm

Here is a view of the bottom of the cam bridge.

The left side of the camshafts bearings actually ride directly in the surface of the cam bridge and the head.
These are referred to as a "plain bearings." IMPORTANT! Do not scar or scratch up these surfaces!

The right side of the camshafts uses typical roller bearings.
The milled slots in the bearing saddles locate the camshaft roller bearings and keep the camshafts from traveling left and right in the head.

The brass "squirty" things are your oil jets. It's a good idea to blow those out with compressed air to make sure they're clear. You can see the oil passages here as well.

Image


Here are some close-ups of the plain bearing "shells" in the cam bridge.
Be sure to inspect them for any discoloration, damage, etc..

Image

Image


Those small holes on the side are the "dimple marks" used for setting TDC on the camshafts:

Image


And a couple of pics of the top of the head and the camshafts.
Note the "flat spots" on the camshafts that are used to find TDC and for registering the cam gears (when they are removed).

Image

Image
"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Mon Jan 09, 2012 9:12 pm

Removing the camshafts

24) Prepare a piece of wire for securing your cam chain (so that it doesn't fall down in the cam chain tower after removing the camshafts.)

25) Lift off the cam chain and carefully/slowly lift up and remove the INTAKE camshaft.

You may need to tilt the camshaft slightly to accomplish this.
Be CAREFUL and don't scratch up the cam lobes or bearing journals.

TIP: Find a patient helper to assist with removing the cams and holding the cam chain! It really does help. :^)

26) Hang the cam chain on your "hanger." (Which is what I used ... a portion of an old, bent coat hanger.)

Image


27) You can now remove the exhaust camshaft.

NOTE: There is a guide plate on the lower crankshaft gear so that the cam chain can't come off.
But you definitely don't want to drop the cam chain down the cam chain tower and have it get wadded up and caught somewhere.

Image


REMEMBER to set your camshafts so that they can't roll off your workbench!

Image
Last edited by E-Ticket on Fri Jan 13, 2012 2:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i

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Re: 2012 KTM 350 EXC-F Wee Beasty: Checking/Adj Valve Cleara

Postby E-Ticket » Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:10 am

Here are some views of the top of the head, the valve levers, and valve spring assemblies:

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Looking down the cam chain tower (...er ... "hole?" ... <g>) you can see the black, chain guide bar.
It is plastic-coated aluminum.

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This pic shows the chain guide pushed rear-ward.
You can also see the round hole where the CCT comes through and presses against the chain guide bar.

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And the view from the left side of the engine.
If you squint your eyes *just* so ... you can see the reflection of the spark plug another 4 feet down that hole.
Geez ..... could they have made it any more inaccessible?

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"AYHIN"

Mine: '12 KTM 350 EXC-F (Wee Beasty); '99 Honda VFR 800i Interceptor
Wife's: '08 KTM 250 XCF-W, '04 Honda CBR600 F4i


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